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Resort and backcountry skiing and snowboarding in eastern US and Canada, including our famous reader-submitted No-Bull Snow Reports.
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Re: Some Love for Eastern Snow from Wasatch Weather Weenies

Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:04 pm

Steenburgh has confirmed what we all know.

Add some real mountains and we're in business.

Re: Some Love for Eastern Snow from Wasatch Weather Weenies

Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:10 pm

jamesdeluxe wrote:Steenburgh has confirmed what we all know.


Here are a few quotes from a Utah snow researcher...

Tug Hill lake effect snow is even drier and more powdery than snow in Utah (...) "Tug Hill has the greatest snow in the world"

Tug Hill snowfalls are "probably the most intense storms in the world". That's measured by the sheer number of inches that fall over a short period of time.
:-"

Re: Some Love for Eastern Snow from Wasatch Weather Weenies

Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:11 am

These researchers really have to visit Hokkaido, which has lake effect on steroids. Tug Hill reputedly gets 250 inches per year. Niseko gets 177 in January alone.
That's measured by the sheer number of inches that fall over a short period of time.

Orographic uplift is also a key to that. Tug Hill's is about 500 feet. Japan's is more like 4,000 feet. Sierra and Cascade snowfalls within a short period of time should also be compared.

Re: Some Love for Eastern Snow from Wasatch Weather Weenies

Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:34 am

It's interesting that Steenburgh, given where he lives, is such a huge Tug Hill wx fan.

A commenter mentions the amazing 1966 blizzard, which my parents still talk about. Heh, 50 inches of snow on one day.

Re: Some Love for Eastern Snow from Wasatch Weather Weenies

Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:44 pm

Tony Crocker wrote:These researchers really have to visit Hokkaido, which has lake effect on steroids. Tug Hill reputedly gets 250 inches per year. Niseko gets 177 in January alone.
That's measured by the sheer number of inches that fall over a short period of time.

Orographic uplift is also a key to that. Tug Hill's is about 500 feet. Japan's is more like 4,000 feet. Sierra and Cascade snowfalls within a short period of time should also be compared.


They mention Japan.
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