Aussies tour the west.

Resort and backcountry skiing and snowboarding in the western US and Canada, including our famous reader-submitted No-Bull Snow Reports.

Moderator: Tony Crocker

Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Sbooker » Tue Mar 03, 2020 9:31 pm

Oh. And almost as good as the skiing and touring around is the gourmet beer at bargain prices. A six pack of this (in my new Snowbird glass) is $10. Thanks to the Oz governments ideas on tax that same six pack is $25 at home.

As a side note. We had lunch at Gwyn’s at Snowmass on Monday. They have been there for 40 plus years. Aspen Ski Co are not renewing their lease after this season. Gwyn’s is the last food outlet on the mountain not owned by ASC.
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Tony Crocker » Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:11 pm

I'm fairly sure Bonnie's on Ajax and Cloud 9 at Highlands are independent. I highly recommend both. Bonnie's is more casual but the strudel with homemade whipped cream would hold its own in Austria.

I'm surprised you couldn't find compatible demo skis in Aspen. After all cost is no object if Delta has to pick up the tab. When my skis didn't make it to Austria for 3 days in 2013, I demoed Atomic Alibis in Lech that skied essentially the same as my daily driver Blizzard Bonafides.

I have concluded it is not worth the hassle for me to take skis when skiing Australia or New Zealand. All of my demos there in 1997, 2006 and 2010 were fine. Of course skiing is generally just a fraction of those trips, so there is nuisance value in schlepping skis through tropical locations en route. Sbooker's trips in North America are heavily ski-centric. While I haul skis to my winter Alps trips for the same reason, I probably would not take them to Europe in late spring/summer where skiing would be a small fraction of the overall trip.

South America is the one destination where I had bad luck with rentals and would not trust them there despite other travel hassles.
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Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Sbooker » Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:42 am

Tony Crocker wrote:I'm fairly sure Bonnie's on Ajax and Cloud 9 at Highlands are independent. I highly recommend both. Bonnie's is more casual but the strudel with homemade whipped cream would hold its own in Austria.

I'm surprised you couldn't find compatible demo skis in Aspen. After all cost is no object if Delta has to pick up the tab. When my skis didn't make it to Austria for 3 days in 2013, I demoed Atomic Alibis in Lech that skied essentially the same as my daily driver Blizzard Bonafides.

I have concluded it is not worth the hassle for me to take skis when skiing Australia or New Zealand. All of my demos there in 1997, 2006 and 2010 were fine. Of course skiing is generally just a fraction of those trips, so there is nuisance value in schlepping skis through tropical locations en route. Sbooker's trips in North America are heavily ski-centric. While I haul skis to my winter Alps trips for the same reason, I probably would not take them to Europe in late spring/summer where skiing would be a small fraction of the overall trip.

South America is the one destination where I had bad luck with rentals and would not trust them there despite other travel hassles.


It was the boots I had a hassle with. They were in the ski bag too. The Volkl Mantras I tried were fine although probably a bit too much for me in steeper sections with bumps under the powder. I ended up buying Blizzard Rustler 9. They offer all the attributes I need without being heavy and burly which would be too much for someone who is at an intermediate level and is also small in stature like myself.
I’ll check out Cloud 9 tomorrow.
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Tony Crocker » Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:28 am

sbooker wrote:It was the boots I had a hassle with. They were in the ski bag too.

This was a lesson I learned the hard way in 2008. I was in France for a week before 4 days in Utah. I had zero luggage for the first three of the Utah days and would have really been in trouble if admin had not kindly outfitted me head to toe in ski clothing. I still had to rent boots and skis, and thanks to the rental boots I declined to hike Baldy and ski Main Chute despite favorable conditions.

At the time James and others immediately chimed in about ALWAYS take your ski boots as carry-on. I bought a boot bag backpack and have followed that advice ever since. Liz will occasionally carry-on the boots on the way TO a ski destination but check them on the way home. In 2018 that didn't work out when her ski bag was still AWOL two days after arriving home from the Alps when we drove to Mammoth for the demo event.

Reasonable modifications to the above advice: It's most important to carry on the boots if you have a change of planes and/or it's a small plane flying into a ski town airport like Aspen. Also, as James noted the ski bag is the weakest link of being not being put on the plane. If your boots are in a conventional suitcase their odds of arriving are better than if in a ski bag.
http://bestsnow.net
Ski Records
Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Sbooker » Wed Mar 04, 2020 5:58 pm

Tony Crocker wrote:
sbooker wrote:It was the boots I had a hassle with. They were in the ski bag too.

This was a lesson I learned the hard way in 2008. I was in France for a week before 4 days in Utah. I had zero luggage for the first three of the Utah days and would have really been in trouble if admin had not kindly outfitted me head to toe in ski clothing. I still had to rent boots and skis, and thanks to the rental boots I declined to hike Baldy and ski Main Chute despite favorable conditions.

At the time James and others immediately chimed in about ALWAYS take your ski boots as carry-on. I bought a boot bag backpack and have followed that advice ever since. Liz will occasionally carry-on the boots on the way TO a ski destination but check them on the way home. In 2018 that didn't work out when her ski bag was still AWOL two days after arriving home from the Alps when we drove to Mammoth for the demo event.

Reasonable modifications to the above advice: It's most important to carry on the boots if you have a change of planes and/or it's a small plane flying into a ski town airport like Aspen. Also, as James noted the ski bag is the weakest link of being not being put on the plane. If your boots are in a conventional suitcase their odds of arriving are better than if in a ski bag.


Lesson learned for me regarding boots and carry on.

We skied at Highlands today. I’m more convinced than ever that it’s difficult to progress as a skier unless you can ski semi-regularly with more those more advanced. I shared a lift with a local at about 11am and asked if he thought the snow in the Deep Temerity area would have softened and be skiable for an average skier. He opined that the snow should be fine but wisely (I guess) declined to comment on whether I had the ability to take that run. He was going to hike the bowl and invited me to tag along but I took your advice and opted out.
I took the Sodbuster run (I think) and quickly discovered the snow to be crusty and grabby. I was finding turns difficult and I quickly wished I had not taken the run. It took quite a while to get down and I was sweating buckets by the bottom. I’m sure if I had someone with me I would have handled the situation better. I’m really glad I didn’t take Kylie with me. It would have been messy. :-)
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I’ve never been as relieved to see a bottom lift station.
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Pretty spectacular day. Nice scenery too.
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It was crowded.
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I took this photo on Deep Temerity. It looks flat. I need lessons.
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Tony Crocker » Wed Mar 04, 2020 6:50 pm

Deep Temerity is a candidate for toughest terrain terrain pod in North America. So I'm not surprised by your experience there.
sbooker wrote:quickly discovered the snow to be crusty and grabby

It does not help that primary exposure is east. At that high altitude this is a little early for a spring transition but far from impossible. That's Jackson's primary exposure but Jackson is 2,000+ feet lower.

The bowl is equally long and steep but would have had better snow. I'm guessing you understand now why I did not recommend you skiing it after a 45 minute hike at 12,000 feet.
http://bestsnow.net
Ski Records
Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
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Re: Aussies tour the west.

Postby Sbooker » Wed Mar 04, 2020 7:13 pm

Tony Crocker wrote:Deep Temerity is a candidate for toughest terrain terrain pod in North America. So I'm not surprised by your experience there.
sbooker wrote:quickly discovered the snow to be crusty and grabby

It does not help that primary exposure is east. At that high altitude this is a little early for a spring transition but far from impossible. That's Jackson's primary exposure but Jackson is 2,000+ feet lower.

The bowl is equally long and steep but would have had better snow. I'm guessing you understand now why I did not recommend you skiing it after a 45 minute hike at 12,000 feet.


Message received loud and clear.
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