Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

The Ski Rack is the discussion area for snowsports gear. See what your fellow readers think about the skis that you're thinking of buying, or get some feedback on the equipment that's right for you.

Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Jay Suds » Fri Dec 10, 2004 9:38 pm

I am looking for some equipment recommendations that will set me up for being able to into and around the woods and backcountry easier than a fixed heel setup, except I can't tele ... so I'm not sure where that leaves me :)

I'm a 22, 5'9 165lbs, advanced/"expert" east coast skier and I do not have a great deal of real backcountry experience, so if you could really dumb it down that'd be helpful. I'm looking for recommendations on *everything* I'll need - skis, boots, bindings, skins, pack, etc.

Thanks!
Jay Suds
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 7:15 pm
Location: Niantic, CT

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby riverc0il » Fri Dec 10, 2004 10:30 pm

funny you mention this, jay suds. i have recently decided that making a gear conversion to Alpine Touring gear is the way to go for myself. now if i just had the money :lol:. AT gear lets you free heel up the mountain then lock your binding back down for the descent. uphill ability with downhill performance sensibility without needing to learn a new turn. plus access to areas previously difficult to access easily.

here's a really good article to get you obsessing about uber expensive gear and untracked snow :D
http://www.wildsnow.com/articles/at_art ... e_big.html
--Steve

TheSnowWay.com
"Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs
User avatar
riverc0il
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 12:22 am
Location: Ashland, NH

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby hamdog » Fri Dec 10, 2004 10:49 pm

not to familiar with the ski setup as some of the folks here. although i do
know you'll need some bindings like this
http://www.backcountry.com/store/BLD024 ... d=CDTTWEG4

skins. pick some you like, but accension skins are some of the best.
they have different widths. get the width for your ski's.

depending on where you decide you go, since you're on the east, it might
be a good idea to look into some avi gear, but it's not essential. if you
plan to head out into avi terrain then get the gear and know how to use
it. freeheel's and skins will get you there though.
User avatar
hamdog
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 5:57 pm
Location: Hollis, NH

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby hamdog » Sat Dec 11, 2004 9:56 pm

ironic enough, i went out into the backcountry today with someone using these:
http://www.outdoorreview.com/ski-equipm ... 14crx.aspx

the cheaper route (instead of those freeride bindings).

although, you should tighten all screws before you go out with them. the guy who was using these today had a screw fall out and had to skin the rest of the way with one heel free, and the other one locked down. since we were almost at the ridge he decided to keep going. slowed the pace down a bit, but toughed it out anyways. the screw that fell out was in the front part of the binding that clicked into the toe part of the regular ski binding. you'll see what i mean once you see a pair of these up close. i don't know how old the ones he was using either.

i think that these things and some skins would be the cheapest way for you to get out into the backcountry. good luck and enjoy the first tracks.
User avatar
hamdog
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2004 5:57 pm
Location: Hollis, NH

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby riverc0il » Sun Dec 12, 2004 4:26 am

my research has indicated the alpine trekkers really aren't worth it if you're seriously giving AT a try. the price is simply way to high for what you get when you consider you can get last year's freeride's for less than a $100 more at some online stores. my thought it, if you know you're gonna do it, than just do it instead of investing that much money into an imitation of the real deal because you're just gonna get the AT gear eventually any ways. if you're strapped for cash, you can get skis a few years old for $100 or less on ebay. the trekkers look like an option for people out west needing to quickly access back sides of ski areas that aren't doing a ton of hiking and absolutely need to have their alpine gear for knarly terrain. i can't image they would be very fun doing 2000 vertical feet of skinning.
--Steve

TheSnowWay.com
"Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs
User avatar
riverc0il
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 12:22 am
Location: Ashland, NH

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Jay Suds » Sun Dec 12, 2004 5:08 am

Ahh well, I may just have to tap the emergency fund for this gear !!! Now, I wonder if InnerBoot Works in Stowe sells any AT boots. I think my fiance is gonna take a crap, but she doesn't have to know how much it cost - it's still my money LOL ...
Jay Suds
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 7:15 pm
Location: Niantic, CT

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Admin » Sun Dec 12, 2004 5:14 pm

This season marks my migration into randonnée, Alpine touring, or AT - whatever you prefer to call it - so I might as well offer my $0.02.

Re: the Alpine Trekkers that hamdog mentioned, there are two big, big disadvantages to using them. First of all, they weigh a bloody ton, and you're the one lifting all of that weight as you climb. Secondly, Alpine boots without a walk or climbing mode will be incredibly uncomfortable for anything but near-bounds sidecountry, not to mention heavy as well. Not an optimal solution.

Secondly, search our website for "Garmont Adrenalin". That's the first hybrid boot with both DIN-compatible Alpine soles and rockered AT soles -- two types of skiing, one pair of boots. They're also much stiffer than other AT boots, thus providing superior downhill performance, yet weigh in at only 8 lbs or so per pair. I love mine, just watch your oven's temperature setting. ;-)

For skis, it's a compromise between weight and width. The further you plan to venture afield, the more you want to favor the weight end of the continuum, but you'll need sufficient width to handle the powder, crud and crust that you'll find off-piste.

Finally, for skins, Ascension and Glide-Rite, both made by Black Diamond, and G3 are all generally regarded as the best. Make sure you get a pair with a tailkit.
Image

Image
User avatar
Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9973
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby JimG. » Mon Dec 13, 2004 3:55 pm

The Lou Dawson article that Rivercoil posted is a good one, but it amazes me that most articles you read about AT seem to focus only on the Dynafit AT bindings. These are the lightest AT bindings out there, but if you're heavier than say 165lbs these are not a good choice for you. Heavier skiers tend to pop out of the Dynafits, especially in touring mode and that can be a real pain, especially in deep snow. In addition, when I look at the Dynafits I really wonder about the safety/release characteristics. They just look flimsy to me.

I would suggest Fritschi or Silvretta AT bindings instead. I use the Fritschi Freerides and, while heavier than the Dynafits, they are pretty beefy and have release adjustability. I ski them as everyday bindings and they have held up very well.
Gravity-it's not just a good idea, it's the law!
User avatar
JimG.
 
Posts: 651
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2004 7:05 am
Location: Hopewell Jct, NY; Avatar-MRG 20th hole

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Admin » Mon Dec 13, 2004 4:05 pm

A good, but pricey compromise between the light weight of the Dynafit and the beefy but heavy Fritschi is the Silvretta Pure.
Image

Image
User avatar
Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9973
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby psychonobi » Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:29 pm

AT gear would be ideal if you are devoted to alpine style...the newest stuff is pretty bomber. Tele gear is built for the backcountry, but again, you have to buy complete set-ups. I invested in tele gear last year, but do not feel comfortable enough yet to take them out in the bc. A cheap alternative to that would be the alpine trekkers. I just picked up a used pair for $90. Hopefully they will not be too heavy, but it will be a better than what I have done in the past...skis & boots on the pack and snowshoeing up. I figure eliminating the weight off my back will be an improvement.
User avatar
psychonobi
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 1:51 pm
Location: Montague, MA

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Tony Crocker » Tue Dec 14, 2004 6:33 pm

I rented AT gear at Mammoth for my day at Tioga Pass in May 2003. I just put my custom orthotics into the rented Scarpa Denali boots and they worked fine.

Adam has rented tele gear the several times he has used it at Mammoth. We have both had no complaints.
http://bestsnow.net
Ski Records
Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
User avatar
Tony Crocker
 
Posts: 9803
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 10:37 am
Location: Avatar: Charlotte Bay, Antarctica 2011
Location: Glendale, California

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby NHpowderhound » Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:14 am

I use the Fritschi Diamir Titanal-3,or T-3's and I love em! I got them last year and used them quite a few times for climbing. At 5'9" and 155# the T-3's have a high enough of a DIN setting for me. My research prior to purchasing led me to decide between the F.D. T-3 or the Naxo binding. One thing to be wary of with the Diamir is big guys trying to carve big turns on groomers.The toepiece may come of the ski. But besides that they are a great binding and I'll buy another pair for my new stix.
I currently use my Atomic downhill boots but as Marc points out, they are very heavy and I need to unbuckle them to climb. But I do alright :wink:
I've had good luck with my Ascension Clip Fix skins. Make sure you get them wide enough.
I think my most important backcountry gear is my helmet and a little common sense. Pack a map and compass befor the cell phone. Make sure you water supply is insulated if you plan on being in the B.C..
Where are you planning to go?
((*
*))NHPH
User avatar
NHpowderhound
 
Posts: 435
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 5:56 am
Location: Cow Hampsha' -Avatar: Jay Peak Face

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Admin » Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:23 am

At 145 lbs, I sure didn't need the extra DIN of the Freeride, either, but keep in mind that the T-3 doesn't include brakes. By the time you add ski brakes to the T-3, the price of each is pretty much the same.

Naxos had some durability issues before, that have reportedly been solved for this year. The last thing you need is for the binding to break when you're miles from nowhere, so be sure that you're buying this year's model if the Naxo is what you want. Details on the durability issues, and the means to identify the 04/05 model from the 03/04 model, are here on Lou Dawson's website. Realize, though, that the "new" Naxo hasn't had time to be adequately field tested.
Image

Image
User avatar
Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9973
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Jay Suds » Sun Dec 19, 2004 3:57 pm

Wowza, I just bought my setup:

165cm Dynastar Legend 8000
Garmont Adrenalin boot
Silvretta Pure binding
Ascension Nylonx ClipFix 120mm skins

And now I am broke!
Jay Suds
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 7:15 pm
Location: Niantic, CT

Re: re: Equipment for getting into the woods/backcountry

Postby Admin » Sun Dec 19, 2004 7:30 pm

Jay Suds wrote:Wowza, I just bought my setup:

165cm Dynastar Legend 8000
Garmont Adrenalin boot
Silvretta Pure binding
Ascension Nylonx ClipFix 120mm skins

And now I am broke!


Nice!! I haven't skied the 8000, but I know that you liked the demo. You're gonna love those Adrenalins! I adore mine. The Pure is nice and light, a fraction of my freerides, and the Ascensions are the standard by which all other skins are measured.
Image

Image
User avatar
Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 9973
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah

Next

Return to Snowsports Equipment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


All content herein copyright © 1999-2017 First Tracks!! Online Media

Forums Terms & Conditions of Use