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What would be the best focus to learn something new at a sma

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What would be the best focus to learn something new at a small resort???

Freeride/park/pipe on twin tips
3
50%
Tele
1
17%
Forget it. Work more on carving and bumps as you always have.
2
33%
 
Total votes : 6

What would be the best focus to learn something new at a sma

Postby Ryan » Thu Dec 16, 2004 12:20 pm

I ski at a small mountain and really want to pick up something new that I know nothing about this winter. I am thinking that I want to either buy a set of twin tips and learn how to freeride or get some tele equipment and try that out. Looking for some opinions.
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby Tony Crocker » Thu Dec 16, 2004 5:53 pm

As you might guess from my other posts, I would vote for park skills. As Adam found out at Mike Douglas' camps, both rails and airs are tough to learn, and presumably one could work on those for an extened period at a small area if the park is well maintained. Just look at the expert jibbers in places like Big Bear and the Quebec City areas.

On teles Adam had the groomers nailed on the first day after a one hour lesson. For most of the expert skiers posting here, that is likely to be typical. So the improving tele skier is going to want to go off-piste, and in a small snowmaking-dependent area that is not likely to be possible.

This is an abstract comment as my 52-year old body can take only small doses of parks, and my balance and conditioning would both need to be upgraded to consider teles. I'm also not that motivated as I have tried AT and that would clearly work for me best in the backcountry.
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Re: re: What would be the best focus to learn something new

Postby JimG. » Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:33 am

Tony Crocker wrote:As you might guess from my other posts, I would vote for park skills.


Totally agree; I'm in my mid-40's and really spent time in a park last spring for the first time. After spending several runs in the pipe, I was amazed at how smooth my bump skiing was afterwards. And all I really did was learn how to ski up the walls, catch some air, and turn back around to go back down into the pipe. My buddy Karl felt the same way.

My sons are into kickers and jumps now, so I guess I'll be spending more time doing stuff like this. Also, I was amazed that it WAS NOT hard at all on my body, save for wipeouts.
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby Ryan » Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:40 am

Thanks for the insight thus far. From speaking to my head of ski school and my GM they have some new park toys this year. We got a new pipe dragon last year and are planning to re-cut the pipe more than once this season.... The bigger news is that my little home resort has acquired a new groomer specifically designed for making park features so it can do a lot of fun things that our other piston bullys can't do. That being said there should be a good number of fun and well maintained features to go play on this season.
On the other hand there is only 1 instructor doing tele on my entire ski school. There are also frighteningly few people doing it on the mountain. If I were to go in that direction and get good at it as fast as you guys seem to think may happen, I could be picking up more request-private lessons. That would mean more $$$ in my pocket to go ski bigger places on.
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby knotty_ski » Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:51 am

Ryan,

think about what you want to ski carefully, bud. Do you remember how much you hated those twin-tips you skiied at Killington a few weeks ago? Just because you can go backwards and jib doesn't mean you'll like that type of ski in or out of the park.

Besides, Justin and I were talking about telemarking this year by getting some boots and bindings on some old alpine skis. Maybe if you do that you'll inspire us to actually spend our moldy money and do it.

See you tomorrow!!
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Re: re: What would be the best focus to learn something new

Postby JimG. » Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:00 am

knotty_ski wrote:Do you remember how much you hated those twin-tips you skiied at Killington a few weeks ago? Just because you can go backwards and jib doesn't mean you'll like that type of ski in or out of the park.


Remember what brand/model they were? I demoed at least 6 different makes of twintips before I decided on my Dynastars. I was amazed at how different each make/model was; a few I liked and a few I thought were garbage. In the end, the Dynastars stood out far and away as the best overall ski for my skiing habits.
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby Guest » Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:26 am

Ryan might remember the make and model, I don't, but I own a pair of Dyanastar twin tips that I absolutely love. They're three years old and have a piece of rail that's been broken out and repaired but I love jibbing with them. The fact that they've been broken makes it easier to abuse them now so they've become my "rock" skis. Northwest PA backcountry skiing can be somewhat devastating to skis.

That's interesting that you had to go through so many different types of twin tip before you found one you like. Anybody try Atomic's new model yet? They have a third rail in the middle.
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby knotty_ski » Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:40 am

That last reply was mine. Sorry, I forgot to log in.
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Re: re: What would be the best focus to learn something new

Postby JimG. » Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:54 am

Anonymous wrote:I own a pair of Dyanastar twin tips that I absolutely love. They're three years old...Anybody try Atomic's new model yet? They have a third rail in the middle.


Dynastar Candides (green/orange graphics) or the Concept 178 (Blue)? It's the same ski with different graphics, the Candide being the older version. These are what I ski; I got the Concept 178 2 seasons ago and have skied them into rock ski status, so I bought a pair of new Candides off of e-bay for this season. Great skis!

I tried the Atomics and didn't like them. They use that "synthetic wood" core that's supposed to ski like a wood core but it skis much stiffer. I didn't like them because I ski bumps alot and the Atomics did not perform well for me in bumps.
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Re: re: What would be the best focus to learn something new

Postby Ryan » Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:29 pm

knotty_ski wrote:
think about what you want to ski carefully, bud. Do you remember how much you hated those twin-tips you skiied at Killington a few weeks ago? Just because you can go backwards and jib doesn't mean you'll like that type of ski in or out of the park.

Besides, Justin and I were talking about telemarking this year by getting some boots and bindings on some old alpine skis. Maybe if you do that you'll inspire us to actually spend our moldy money and do it.



Yea yea.... they were Fischer Big Stix. I think that I would rather walk down a run that get back on those fat pieces of ....... well. Nevermind. Not in polite company. Needless to say they were worthless, mushy, sluggish, unresponsive, not to mention I could chatter them badly with even a moderate amount of edge pressure in a carve. not for me.

There has to be a set of twins out there that I would like. I want something snappy though. quick edge to edge and still able to carve a bit but fun in the park. What I think I'll do however is buy something cheap on Ebay so I can learn to grind on them and not care.


On the other hand I am still thinking that tele would be great... especially if some other instructors pick it up like Knotty here....
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re: What would be the best focus to learn something new at a

Postby knotty_ski » Mon Dec 20, 2004 10:38 am

They are the concepts, 178's, just like yours. I bought them two seasons ago too and they are definitely at rock ski status. The first season I bought them I broke out a piece of the rail had a new piece welded in and still liked them.
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