2017-18 Season Recap

Topics of a general nature regarding snowsports, which don't easily fit into one of our other Liftlines categories. This is also the place to post Letters to the Editor.

Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby tseeb » Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:38 pm

My season total is 55 days/1.212 M vertical and I'm probably done. Both were new highs as previous was 52 days the last two years (counting a June 2017 day with two Carson Pass 'runs' from hiking). I had just over 1.2M vertical in 2015-16.

I count 25 days where I skied a lot of new snow. Note that this includes 5 of my Whistler days, but only one of my Castle/Fernie days even though I think we found some all four days. I also did not include the two days in May with thin new wet precipitation at Mammoth.

CA total 30
Kirkwood 16
Heavenly 11
Skied both preceding areas on 3 days so above totals 24 days
Mammoth 4, 2 on this year's MCP and two on next year's Ikon
Sierra 1 short/free day when I checked out and bought a car for my son on way
Squaw 1 day in May on next year's Ikon. My 3 MCP days there were not used

BC total 14
Revelstoke (MCP)
Mustang 3
Kicking Horse 2
Fernie* 2
Whistler 6 (Epic Local)

AB total 2 Castle*

UT total 7
Park City 1 and 2 each on MCP at Snowbasin, Alta and Snowbird

WA 1 Stevens Pass

OR 1 Bachelor

Total on Epic Local 31 with 24 in CA (some were also or all NV and no days at Northstar for first time in many years) 1 UT, 6 BC. Days on MCP was 9.

My wife, who is hoping to retire in Jan 2019 did not ski this season in CA. But she had a good year with 12 days; 6 in UT on MCP, 5 at Whistler and one at Bachelor, her first time there in over 30 years.
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby tseeb » Thu Jul 05, 2018 4:00 pm

What happened to q? He only had one post after his mid-December report on skiing in Scotland in the wrong size boots. This article on Discovery made me think about him: https://www.powder.com/latitudes/a-delicate-balance/

Powder also put a couple more good articles into my Facebook feed that I thought were worth sharing. I've had them open on my iPad for a long time and at least by posting them, I can take them off my open tabs. The first https://www.powder.com/stories/separation-anxiety/ is about the owners of Great Divide, MT and the second https://www.powder.com/stories/skiing-a ... l-never-2/ is a short essay about a couple of days skiing in the Pyrenees.

A more controversial one from this May is https://www.powder.com/stories/climate- ... -80-years/
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby jamesdeluxe » Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:43 am

tseeb wrote:the second is a short essay about a couple of days skiing in the Pyrenees.

Yikes: a $300 fine -- and what's the bit about a U.S. license not being valid in that part of Spain? :-k

I'm going to the Pyrenees next season, including Baqueira, and will make sure to drive under the speed limit.
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby Tony Crocker » Wed Jul 11, 2018 7:57 am

Those are interesting articles on the 2 Montana ski areas. Discovery's future seems much more secure because the next generation of the operating family wants to carry on managing the area, which is not the case at Great Divide. My suspicions are confirmed that Great Divide is far enough leeward of enough Montana mountains to be snowmaking dependent.

The climate articles are tabloid clickbait, a list of bold bullet points 80 years in the future based upon the the most extreme scenario of probably not the most recent IPCC report. There will be far more serious problems than in ski areas if temperatures were to rise 8.8 degrees F.
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Ski Records
Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby tseeb » Mon Aug 06, 2018 6:47 pm

Tony Crocker wrote:There will be far more serious problems than in ski areas if temperatures were to rise 8.8 degrees F.


www.washingtonpost.com/national/health- ... story.html says "If nothing is done to curb greenhouse-gas emissions, scientists say, the global temperature increase could reach nine degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century, with higher spikes on land and at high latitudes."

The source for the 9 degrees temperature increase is science2017.globalchange.gov/chapter/1/ and Key Finding 4 includes "With significant reductions in the emissions of greenhouse gases, the global annually averaged temperature rise could be limited to 3.6°F (2°C) or less. Without major reductions in these emissions, the increase in annual average global temperatures relative to preindustrial times could reach 9°F (5°C) or more by the end of this century (high confidence)."
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby Tony Crocker » Tue Aug 07, 2018 12:12 pm

Without major reductions in these emissions, the increase in annual average global temperatures relative to preindustrial times could reach 9°F (5°C) or more by the end of this century (high confidence)."

I'm not particularly disputing this assertion. However, it's sort of like the prediction, "If current trends continue, medical expenses will be 50% of US GDP by some distant date in the future. In both cases the consequences are so costly that some kind of action is likely to occur before that point is reached.

A recent Society of Actuaries magazine commented upon the issue of attributing specific weather events to climate change. The main point is that if 100 year events are occurring every 5 years for example, there's a good case to allocate some fraction of causation of such an event to climate change. The current fire situation is California is perhaps an example. Fires are a natural fact of life in Southern California with normal summer/autumn weather, especially autumn when Santa Ana wind frequency increases. I've lived here most of my life and distinctively remember huge fire seasons in 1961, 1978 and 1993, so nothing new here. But I do not remember such frequency in Northern California, and neither does Liz, who lived there 1964-1971. The Ferguson fire which has closed Yosemite Valley for about two weeks is the third major fire in the foothill region west of Yosemite since the 2012-2015 drought started. The Mendocino Complex fire, now a state record 288,000 acres, is just north of the area that burned in Napa/Santa Rosa last October, and there have been other major fires in that general area since 2012.

The Hurricane Harvey discussion in science2017.globalchange.gov/chapter/1/ is more controversial. It claims Harvey had 15% more water due to higher temperatures. The Gulf of Mexico was in fact only 0.5 degrees warmer than long term average at that time, which is a very modest deviation IMHO. We had our first beach day yesterday, and due to the hot July the ocean here in SoCal is probably 4-5 degrees higher than average. Water at Scripps Pier in San Diego reached a record high of 78.8F during the July heat while we were out of town the entire month.
http://bestsnow.net
Ski Records
Season length: 21 months, Nov. 29, 2010 - July 2, 2012
Days in one year: 80 from Nov. 29, 2010 - Nov. 17, 2011
Season vertical: 1,610K in 2016-17
Season powder: 291K in 2011-12
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Re: 2017-18 Season Recap

Postby tseeb » Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:33 am

Tony Crocker wrote:
...consequences are so costly that some kind of action is likely to occur before that point is reached.
That hasn't worked so well for sea life off SW Florida where "[i]Anything that can leave has, and anything that couldn't leave has died."

Source is https://www.nationalgeographic.com/envi ... fe-toxins/ which also includes "Red tide in the Gulf certainly isn't new, with reports as far back as the 1500s when Spanish explorers documented what seemed to be K. brevis-like fish kills and irritating fumes. But this latest event has turned into an algal nightmare, causing many to question the reasons behind such an intense bloom, and whether humans might be to blame. There are no easy answers, scientists say, and many researchers are split on the culprits."
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